s

Tag Archives: Abuse of Discretion

Insurance Company Bias in ERISA Cases: Hartford’s History of Bias and Discovery of an Insurer’s Biased Claims Administration Process

Posted in: Abuse of Discretion, Conflict of Interest, Disability Insurance, Discovery, ERISA, Health Insurance, Insurance Litigation Blog, Life Insurance September 26, 2018

The Employee Retirement Income Security Act (“ERISA”), a 1974 federal law, sets minimum standards for many employee benefit plans and serves to provide protection for individuals in these plans.  Discovery in ERISA cases is often limited because the statute’s primary goal is to provide inexpensive and expeditious resolution to employee benefit claims.  District courts are generally limited to the administrative record unless a so-called structural conflict of interest exists.  Considering that insurers make benefit determinations on life, health and disability insurance claims and profit when an adverse decision is made, this scenario creates an inherent conflict of interest whenever an insurer administers a claim.

Courts find that a conflict of interest exists where the “entity that administers the plan, such …

Read More
0

When Guarding the Henhouse, Some Foxes Go Rogue: When an Insurer’s Conflict of Interest Factors into Administrating Group Long-Term Disability ERISA Plans

Posted in: Abuse of Discretion, Accidental Death or Dismemberment, Conflict of Interest, Disability Insurance, Disability Insurance News, ERISA, Health Insurance, Insurance Litigation Blog, Life Insurance, News July 25, 2018

Few Americans can retire on their savings alone.  Many workers participate in an employee benefits plans, which serve to provide financial security in case of disability or retirement.  In the case of insurers that decide who qualifies for life, health and disability insurance benefits, there exists a major concern about the significant conflict of interest that exists when these insurers make these decisions and also pay for these benefits.  Will these insurers exalt their own interests of bottom line profitability over the interests of ERISA plan participants and beneficiaries who file claims for life, health and disability benefits? It is not a leap of logic that this conflict of interest results in insurance companies wrongfully denying ERISA benefit claims.

In

Read More
0

Ninth Circuit Grants a Small Reprieve to the Abuse of Discretion Standard of Review, Ruling That Discretionary Language Provisions in Self-Funded ERISA Will Apply

Posted in: Abuse of Discretion, De Novo Review, Disability Insurance News, ERISA, Insurance Litigation Blog, Standard of Review August 24, 2017

When litigating ERISA-governed short-term disability, long-term disability, life and medical insurance claims, a major consideration is which “standard of review” will apply to the Court’s review of the insurer’s decision – abuse of discretion or de novo.  The de novo standard of review is more claimant friendly.  When applying the abuse of discretion standard of review, the Court is required to give some deference to the insurer’s decision.  Under the de novo standard of review, the Court does not give any deference to the insurer’s decision, but simply makes a determination as to whether available evidence establishes that the insured was disabled under the terms of the Plan.

The abuse of discretion standard of review, which is friendlier to insurers, …

Read More
0

Ruling Limits Insurance Company’s Ability to Collect SSDI Overpayments

Posted in: Case Updates, ERISA June 16, 2016

When and under what circumstances an insurer paying long-term disability benefits may collect retroactive benefits paid to an ERISA plan participant under the Social Security Act has been the source of conflicting opinions over the years.   The most recent pronouncement:  a long-term disability plan administrators must “specifically identify a particular fund” from which it will be reimbursed in order to seek to recover of alleged overpayment of disability benefits.  So held the Southern District of California in its recent plaintiff-friendly decision in Wong v. Aetna Life Insurance Company, 2014 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 135661 (S.D. Cal. 2014).  Through its decision in Wong, the district court reaffirmed that simply because an ERISA governed long-term disability plan’s language provides for recovery …

Read More
0

With Discretionary Language Even Barred in Self-Funded ERISA Plans, is This the Death of The Abuse of Discretion Standard of Review In California?

Posted in: Abuse of Discretion, De Novo Review, Disability Insurance News, ERISA, Standard of Review October 12, 2015

Recently, we explained that District Courts within the state of California, applying California Insurance Code section 10110.6, ruled that, even if an insurance Plan contains language giving discretion to a claim administrator, that language is unenforceable, and de novo is the proper standard of review.  See The Death of the Abuse of Discretion Standard of Review in ERISA Disability Insurance Cases in CaliforniaA recent ruling expanded the application of California’s anti-discretionary language statute to self-funded plans, further signaling the end of the abuse of discretion standard of review in California Federal Courts.…

Read More
0

ERISA Disability Insurance Claimants Take Note – Discovery Is Allowed In De Novo Review Cases

Posted in: Abuse of Discretion, De Novo Review, Disability Insurance News, ERISA, Standard of Review September 14, 2015

Well-intentioned policymakers enacted the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (“ERISA”) over forty years ago to provide for the protection of participants’ employee benefits in part by establishing a uniform set of rules to ensure efficient proceedings.  One of these notable rules limits the scope of permissible evidence for actions commenced under ERISA section 502(a)(1)(B).  This scope of evidence further depends on whether the reviewing federal court employs an abuse of discretion, or de novo, standard of review.  Because discovery can be an expensive and time consuming process, insurers and claims administrators often take the position that discovery is irrelevant and not permitted under ERISA.  As the cases below show, although limited, discovery is not forbidden in de novo …

Read More
0

The Death of the Abuse of Discretion Standard of Review in ERISA Disability Insurance Cases in California

Posted in: Disability Insurance, Disability Insurance News, ERISA, Insurance Litigation Blog July 29, 2015

When an insured obtains his or her disability insurance coverage from an employer, more often than not, that claim is governed by Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974, also known as ERISA. Litigation under ERISA is very different from “normal” bad faith insurance litigation where the insured sues the insurer for breach of contract and breach of the implied covenant of good faith and fair dealing. Some of the differences favor the insured, while others favor the insurance company/claims administrator. However, thanks to the California Legislature and recent District Court rulings, one of the insurer’s asserted weapons is longer available.…

Read More
0

Insurers Do Not Have Discretionary Authority, Absent Clear Language in Official Plan Documents

Posted in: Abuse of Discretion, Administrative Record, Case Updates, De Novo Review, Disability Insurance, Disability Insurance News, ERISA, Insurance Litigation Blog, Insurance Questions and Concepts, Policy Interpretation, Standard of Review April 30, 2015

In actions brought under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (“ERISA”), two roads diverge in federal court—and the court’s choice regarding the applicable standard of review can make all the difference in the scope of permissible evidence.  If the court applies the abuse of discretion standard of review, the court more typically (but not always) only considers evidence received by the insurer in time for its decision and limits its review to the “administrative record” to determine whether the insurer’s denial was an abuse of discretion.  Alternatively, the court may review a case “de novo,” and may consider documents not previously provided to the insurer to determine whether the insured is entitled to benefits. …

Read More
0

Ninth Circuit Affirms MLG’s Six-Figure Judgment in a Disability Suit Filed Against Sun Life

Posted in: Abuse of Discretion, Administrative Record, Case Updates, Conflict of Interest, Disability Insurance, Disability Insurance News, ERISA, Insurance Litigation Blog April 29, 2015

On April 22, 2015, the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit issued a decision affirming the district court’s decision to award McKennon Law Group PC’s client, an attorney (“insured”), his past-due ERISA plan benefits, as well as attorneys’ fees, costs and interest against Sun Life & Health Insurance Company in connection with his short-term and long-term disability insurance claim. …

Read More
0

Ruling Limits Insurance Company’s Ability to Collect SSDI Overpayments

Posted in: Case Updates, Disability Insurance, Disability Insurance News, ERISA, Insurance Litigation Blog January 08, 2015

When and under what circumstances an insurer paying long-term disability benefits may collect retroactive benefits paid to an ERISA plan participant under the Social Security Act has been the source of conflicting opinions over the years.   The most recent pronouncement:  a long-term disability plan administrators must “specifically identify a particular fund” from which it will be reimbursed in order to seek to recover of alleged overpayment of disability benefits.  So held the Southern District of California in its recent plaintiff-friendly decision in Wong v. Aetna Life Insurance Company, 2014 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 135661 (S.D. Cal. 2014).  Through its decision in Wong, the district court reaffirmed that simply because an ERISA governed long-term disability plan’s language provides for recovery …

Read More
0