Department of Labor Proposes New, Claimant-Friendly ERISA Regulations for Disability Insurance Claims

Posted in: Disability Insurance News, ERISA, Health Insurance, News, News Blog December 10, 2015

From time to time, the U.S. Department of Labor promulgates new regulations governing disability insurance benefit claims and health insurance benefit claims that are governed by the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974, commonly referred to as ERISA.  The regulations must be followed by plan administrators and claim administrators when reviewing disability insurance and health insurance benefit claims submitted by claimants.  Recently, the Department of Labor proposed changes to the regulations governing long-term disability insurance benefit claims and short-term disability insurance benefit claims.

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Mistreated by Your Insurer? Insurers May Not Be Able to Hide Behind ERISA Preemption to Defeat Claims for Intentional Infliction of Emotional Distress

Posted in: Breach of Contract, Disability Insurance, Disability Insurance News, ERISA, Health Insurance, Insurance Litigation Blog, Life Insurance, News, Preemption November 30, 2015

Insureds obligingly pay premiums on their life, health and disability insurance policies and dutifully provide updated information upon request by their insurers, but often do not enjoy the same courtesy when they file an insurance claim.  In extreme cases, antagonistic insurers engage in a host of tactics, including appointing claims examiners who refuse to return phone calls, conducting intrusive surveillance, accusing insureds of filing false claims or inundating the insured’s employer and treating doctors with document demands—only to deny the insured’s claim.  Astonished by this treatment, many insureds wonder if they can sue them for emotional distress damages.  The short answer is yes—but there are hurdles.

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With Discretionary Language Even Barred in Self-Funded ERISA Plans, is This the Death of The Abuse of Discretion Standard of Review In California?

Posted in: Abuse of Discretion, De Novo Review, Disability Insurance News, ERISA, Standard of Review October 12, 2015

Recently, we explained that District Courts within the state of California, applying California Insurance Code section 10110.6, ruled that, even if an insurance Plan contains language giving discretion to a claim administrator, that language is unenforceable, and de novo is the proper standard of review.  See The Death of the Abuse of Discretion Standard of Review in ERISA Disability Insurance Cases in CaliforniaA recent ruling expanded the application of California’s anti-discretionary language statute to self-funded plans, further signaling the end of the abuse of discretion standard of review in California Federal Courts.

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ERISA Disability Insurance Claimants Take Note – Discovery Is Allowed In De Novo Review Cases

Posted in: Abuse of Discretion, De Novo Review, Disability Insurance News, ERISA, Standard of Review September 14, 2015

Well-intentioned policymakers enacted the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (“ERISA”) over forty years ago to provide for the protection of participants’ employee benefits in part by establishing a uniform set of rules to ensure efficient proceedings.  One of these notable rules limits the scope of permissible evidence for actions commenced under ERISA section 502(a)(1)(B).  This scope of evidence further depends on whether the reviewing federal court employs an abuse of discretion, or de novo, standard of review.  Because discovery can be an expensive and time consuming process, insurers and claims administrators often take the position that discovery is irrelevant and not permitted under ERISA.  As the cases below show, although limited, discovery is not forbidden in de novo review cases and ERISA claimants should actively seek discovery, taking care to clearly explain why the discovery sought is necessary to a de novo review.

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ERISA Will Not Pre-Empt State Law Claims Under an Individual Conversion Policy

Posted in: Bad Faith, Breach of Contract, Disability Insurance, Disability Insurance News, ERISA, Insurance Litigation Blog September 03, 2015

In an important victory for claimants, a United States District Court recently determined that a plaintiff who obtained an individual disability insurance policy through a conversion provision in an ERISA plan can pursue remedies in a state court under the newly issued individual policy. This ruling is important because the range of damages available through a lawsuit containing state law claims is much broader than the range of damages available through ERISA, and includes emotional distress damages and punitive damages.

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ERISA Insurers’ Conclusory Medical Opinions Regarding Disability Status Will Not Carry the Day

Posted in: Case Updates, De Novo Review, Disability Insurance, Disability Insurance News, ERISA, Insurance Litigation Blog August 20, 2015

An individual suffering from a disabling condition undoubtedly has many concerns. In addition to dealing with physical pain and emotional distress, there is always the thought of how to pay for medical bills and living expenses if the disability prevents the person from continuing work.

It can be stressful and time consuming for a disabled claimant to fight for long-term disability benefits (“LTD”) provided under an ERISA-governed employee benefit plan. However, a recent District Court case, Carrier v. Aetna Life Insurance Company, 2015 WL 4511620 (C.D. Cal. July 24, 2015), may help insureds by making it more difficult for insurance companies/claim administrators to summarily deny an insured’s claim without proof of specific findings and details as to how and why they reached their conclusion to deny benefits.

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The Death of the Abuse of Discretion Standard of Review in ERISA Disability Insurance Cases in California

Posted in: Disability Insurance, Disability Insurance News, ERISA, Insurance Litigation Blog July 29, 2015

When an insured obtains his or her disability insurance coverage from an employer, more often than not, that claim is governed by Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974, also known as ERISA. Litigation under ERISA is very different from “normal” bad faith insurance litigation where the insured sues the insurer for breach of contract and breach of the implied covenant of good faith and fair dealing. Some of the differences favor the insured, while others favor the insurance company/claims administrator. However, thanks to the California Legislature and recent District Court rulings, one of the insurer’s asserted weapons is longer available.

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Court Confirms that Medication Side Effects Can Support a Disability Insurance Claim

Posted in: De Novo Review, Disability Insurance, Disability Insurance News, ERISA, Insurance Litigation Blog June 29, 2015

When a person suffers from a disability caused by an injury or sickness, the resulting restrictions and limitations, be they physical or mental, can have a devastating impact on that person’s ability to return to work. What is often overlooked, is that the side effects of the medication prescribed to treat a medical condition can themselves also impede a person’s ability to perform in the work place, thus resulting in a long-term disability. Recently, Central District of California Federal Court Judge Percy Anderson, in Hertan v. Unum Life Insurance Company of America, 2015 WL 363244 (C.D. Cal. June 9, 2015), ruled that a long-term disability insurer had to consider how the side effects of an insured’s medication impacted her cognitive abilities, and therefore, her ability to perform her job.

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For ERISA Disability Insurance Appeals, A Claimant Who is a Day Late May Not Be a Dollar Short

Posted in: Case Updates, Disability Insurance, Disability Insurance News, ERISA, Insurance Litigation Blog, Insurance Questions and Concepts, Policy Interpretation June 10, 2015

Under most long-term disability insurance plans governed by the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (“ERISA”), a claimant must appeal the denial of any claim for benefits within 180 days of the denial letter. Unless the appeal is made within that strict 180-day period, the claimant may forfeit the right to any short-term disability benefits or long-term disability benefits available under the plan. At least, that was the law until a recent ruling by the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit cracked open the window for a timely appeal.

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Insurers Do No Have Discretionary Authority, Absent Clear Language in Official Plan Documents

Posted in: Abuse of Discretion, Administrative Record, Case Updates, De Novo Review, Disability Insurance, Disability Insurance News, ERISA, Insurance Litigation Blog, Insurance Questions and Concepts, Policy Interpretation, Standard of Review April 30, 2015

In actions brought under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (“ERISA”), two roads diverge in federal court—and the court’s choice regarding the applicable standard of review can make all the difference in the scope of permissible evidence.  If the court applies the abuse of discretion standard of review, the court more typically (but not always) only considers evidence received by the insurer in time for its decision and limits its review to the “administrative record” to determine whether the insurer’s denial was an abuse of discretion.  Alternatively, the court may review a case “de novo,” and may consider documents not previously provided to the insurer to determine whether the insured is entitled to benefits. 

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